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Living In Madrid Pt 2: Talking to Tweens

When I woke up on the first of December and realized that the last three months in Madrid had skated by so quickly, I began to both panic and celebrate. Panic—I’m leaving behind some of the most charming and intelligent young ladies I have ever taken care of, I’m moving away from a city I am just beginning to really get the hang of, and no more patatas bravas (my favorite tapas dish)??? Celebrate—I am going home for the holidays, moving forward from what I would consider a fairly anxious time in my life, and GOING HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS!!

Since returning from Italy last month, I have laid pretty low—I already visited the touristy attractions, I’ve eaten all the traditional foods, watched flamenco dancing, went clubbing…all the interesting stuff to report back about. Honestly, I’ve spent the last month hanging out with the family I work for, reading in parks, Christmas shopping, and wandering around taking pictures. I can say, though: Puerta del Sol at Christmas time is magic. There is a HUGE, hollow-metal-frame Christmas tree completely made of lights that you can WALK THROUGH (A PHOTOGENIC DREAM), there is a teeny tiny Christmas market inside of Plaza Mayor, Christmas music abound, the works.

So, instead of opting out of a blog or writing boring content (like the curious case of my disappearing wallet), I decided to interview two of the three girls that I have been taking care of. They are 10 (Julia) and 14 (Monica), go to an English school in the city, are excellent English speakers, and are wonderful young women.

  1. Favorite movie?

Julia: Inside Out!!!
Monica: Ohhhhh, The Notebook. The book too.

  1. Favorite song?

Both: Lay Me Down by Sam Smith. (laughs together)

  1. Where do you want to visit someday?

Julia: Where do you live?! (I say California) Then California. I want to visit California.
Monica: Hollywood, New York City, Argentina… No I don’t, why did I say Argentina?! Just the first two. (laughs)

  1. Why do you like being a kid/teenager?

Julia: I can do a lot of things and don’t have to buy anything! And the Christmas presents… can’t forget those.
Monica: I DON’T like being a teenager! I don’t. It’s complicated. (more laughter)

  1. One thing you want to learn how to do?

Julia: Sew better!! Like make my own clothes.
Monica: I would love to learn how to dance. Like funky. Like the girls in that new Justin Beiber video…

 

  1. What makes a good friend?

Julia: Telling you the truth, being with you, and helping you with problems. Definitely.
Monica: I think you have to trust her. That’s really important. You have to have fun with her. She has to be there always! Even if you get a good mark on an exam, and when you cry too.

  1. Use only one word to describe yourself right now.

Julia: Pretty!
Monica: Special. I think everyone’s special in their own way, including me. And you!

  1. Describe how you see Spain.

Julia: Pretty, too! And dirty… But mostly pretty.
Monica: Oh I love Spain. It’s my country! Yeah we’ve got problems, but I just love it. I love Madrid.

  1. What’s one thing that’s special about Spain you want everyone to know?

Julia: Paella. It’s delicious.
Monica: I don’t know how you celebrate Christmas in the states but I love Christmas here, EVERYONE comes to Sol and stay there until midnight just counting down and celebrating and having a great time around the huge Christmas tree.

There were more questions but these were my favorite. None of them bore particularly prolific responses, but I think that’s the coolest part about it. I don’t know what I wanted to learn when I turned on the camera and started asking them questions, but that felt just as fun as setting out for a specific answer or message. These girls live a half a world apart from most of my readers, but most likely responded in the same cute, quip and innocent way that any of the 10 and 14 year olds you know would. They study for exams and worry about boys and love chocolate and Pringles. These girls are a lot like the kids I worked with in Taiwan, or the ones I lived with in Senegal, or the girls and boys I talked to in Malaysia. Pure hearted, fun to talk to, and loving the fact they got a moment to sit and talk and have the attention fully on them. In light of all the terror that has broken out all around the world, it’s really important that we take a moment to remember that we are the common thread. A mountain or an ocean can separate us, but all children will sing Frozen songs at the drop of a hat if you let them.

I am posting this on a Thursday. I left Madrid on Monday, and went on a secret mission. I’ll blog about that in a day or two! Hope everyone is doing great!

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