Category Archives: travel

Bali’ing on a Budget (with Queen Mom!!)

My mom and I went to Bali!!!

…Last September.

And I’m going to stop you right there! I know what you’re thinking: “literally, actually, truly, what is the point of writing a blog about it at this point? You’ve come home for Christmas and made the rounds talking about your travels, we KNOW.”

But this blog–my dearly dormant intrepidandintransit–is meant to be a chronological memento for myself and anyone else out there who’s still paying attention. And, most importantly, I really want to commemorate the trip my mom and I shared. The details to come are literally only possible because that precious woman sent me a nearly minute-by-minute itinerary that she updated as our vacation chugged along.

I love her. And every opportunity I have to see her is like a big, warm hug. Which, frankly, I would love one of right now.

We were only in Bali together for about 5 days. That’s WAY too short, I agree, but I was working with the little off-time I had. We met at the airport. During my layover on the way there, I realized I had lost my laptop charger (and I work online, so a laptop on holiday is non-negotiable). Our very kind shuttle bus driver went out of his way to help us buy me a new one on the way to our hotel. And thus, we became acquainted with Balinese hospitality–as warm and welcoming as the island’s weather.

The days blur together for me now. Here’s the highlights reel:

  1. Our hotel had an awesome pool that we utilized every night right as it was about to close. That pool holds a special place in our hearts. Unlike Queen Jen, the only note I have in my phone about the trip says “Mom looked so happy floating around in the pool last night… 10/10 would recreate.”
  2. I got 3 different pedicures in the span of 5 days. And a massage. And we had fish nibble at our feet. 
  3. Every meal we had was SO COOL. The food was great, but it was like each time we sat down in a new place, it was an experience in and of itself. From the hotel room service (watching Stranger Things for the first time, woah), to the rice paddies of Ubud sipping fresh pineapple juice, to a beachfront restaurant during a rainstorm eating the freshest seafood I have ever encountered. Love.
  4. The sun is a powerful goddess of whom I respect and fear. What I wanted more than anything was a lazy afternoon “tanning” on the beach during this vacation. So mom and I set out to do that. 4 beers and a cocktail deep, two lobsters scurried off the beach and back to the hotel to bathe in aloe. Oops!
  5. Sunsets in Bali are as out of this world as everyone brags about. Truly. The two most notable were a) at the Uluwatu temple as we watched a traditional Indonesian dance ritual, and b) on a dinner cruise, accompanied by fancy cocktails and a drag show.
  6. We hired a car for one of the days (super cheap, makes you feel cool without actually breaking the bank) and drove through Ubud. We nixed the idea of the Sacred Monkey Forest (who needs tiny monkeys pouncing at them and stealing their purse on vacation?! Joking, kinda, if you’re interested in that more power to ya). Instead, we opted for a tour of a coffee plantation. And Bali is known for it’s Luwak coffee (aka coffee literally eaten, digested, and shat out by a type of cat). We came, we tried, mom liked it.

Bali was amazing. Touristy, definitely, but it is a destination for a reason. It felt like paradise. And apart from a minor meltdown thanks to my laptop being a piece of trash, I was on a high the entire time I was there.

What more could a girl want than spending a week in a tropical dream with their queen?

Love you mom!!

Also, more blogs to come now. Actually. Really. Believe it when you see it… And you’ll see it soon!

HK In a Day!

Sam and I went on an overnight “business” trip to Hong Kong earlier this week. And I feel compelled to share our adventure because of how much of a mess it truly was for everyone involved. Buckle up!

We had to go on this trip to sort some visa stuff out for Taiwan. The process is immediate, so we could have come back to Taiwan same-day, but decided to stay overnight to see some of our friends that live in HK.

We get up hours before our flight, and make our way to the bus station. There’s a thunder/lightning/torrential rain storm happening in Taipei as we are getting onto the bus. And it’s rush hour. Double traffic whammy. The bus is inching through the city at a pace so slow I honestly thought about getting out and running part of the way to make up for time lost (a fleeting thought, obviously.). Collectively, I think everyone on the bus started to realize how late the bus was running at about the same moment. People started to get up and mill about and chat on the phone trying to sort out their situations. Still, Sam and I held on to a fleeting hope that since we had chosen to go to HK without any luggage, they’d just let us sprint through the airport with 2 minutes to spare and a closing gate and a wing and a prayer. But alas.

We get to the airport at about 9:30, flight scheduled for 10. The airline counter tells us we are ten minutes to late to get on to the flight. We beg and plead, and they politely tell us to shove off. We ask to be out onto the next flight, and they tell us to call the travel agency our friend book the flight through. So begins the longest, most pricey 30 minutes of our life. Calls are being placed back and forth—to us, to Jojo, to the travel agent—and we finally get put onto the next flight. Which, again, leaves in about 30 minutes. We scramble through lines, get ushered to customer service, get thrown back into the general line. Get our ticket printed and sprint though the airport to security. Our sweat pools as our purses slowly roll through the machine. We sprint again between security and our gate.

As soon as we get to the gate, we are told that there will be a minor delay because, duh, look outside. You can’t even see the runways it is raining so hard. Nice. This definitely means that that flight we “missed” hadn’t left either. But OKAY, whatever, fine. We’ll just get a bottle of water and chill in the gate. So we do that. And after about 10 minutes we hear an announcement that the plane we were anticipating getting on had been struck by lightning upon its descent into Taipei, so it would be about an hour of routine maintenance before we could leave. OKAY! That’s fine. An hour. Lightning. Okay. Manageable.

But then, an hour passes. They hand out meal vouchers for inside the airport. Another hour passes. We find out the flight has moved gates. Another hour passes. Finally, we get on the flight. And smooth air-sailing from there. No lightning strikes on our flight! Score.

Hong Kong was fun. We saw all of our friends from the past few summers at camp. We all met Emily and her mom for dim sum. We did a little hike up Garden Hill and got some really beautiful panoramic views of HK at night. The hostel we stayed at was trash, and tried to kick me out of my bed in the middle of the night, so I’m going to refrain from including its name! But overall, very fun time in the city.

The next day, we got to the airport 6 hours early. And got drunk. Just in case chaos ensued for the second day in a row. But luckily, everything went smooth on our way back. And now we’re back in Taiwan right in the nick of time—my brother and a few friends are going to be camp counselors here with us this summer! A busy 10 weeks ahead. But I will be taking my peeps to do some of the token touristy stuff in the city throughout the summer, so I’ll try and blog about that stuff!

Hope everyone is well. There is so much shitty shit going on in the States right now. And I really hope everyone is doing okay. Stay strong. And vigilant. And proud of who you are. Love you guys!

Going for Broke in Morocco

In late March, a group of us went to Morocco for spring break. (Listen, I know what you’re thinking: “Har, you graduated from university a year ago, you can’t just arbitrarily celebrate spring break anymore!” Let me live. And my karma came to me. Stay tuned.)

I left Ireland with a heavy heart and not a lot of money to work with, but I was pumped to finally see Morocco, and be back on my favorite continent for the first time in over a year. We had a long, complicated flight path (as usual. Help me, I’m poor!). Finally got to Rabat after dark. Our Airbnb situation ended up being a little ways out of the city, but all the more adventure it became. That first day, we briefly stopped in Rabat (and struggled greatly with buying train tickets, so a silent nod to the young guy in the train station who helped us buy them and physically guide us to the train) before heading to the city of Meknes for a mini-excursion. The train ride was a total ego boost—I spent all two hours chatting with this charming old archaeology professor and really crushing it with a bunch of French I didn’t know I could speak. The old city center (a UNESCO Heritage Site!) of Meknes was beautiful. A labyrinth of streets and vendors and homes and colors, encapsulated by the “Old Gate to the City.” We went to a restaurant with a lovely view of the city called Le Collier de la Colombe. It is upstairs at a hotel, there’s free wifi, the food is phenomenal and cheap, and the women that work there are all super nice. They helped us hail a cab back to the train station so that we wouldn’t miss the last one back to Rabat. (Didn’t, but then gloriously missed the last train back to Bouznika from there and had to take a taxi. Live and learn in Morocco I guess!)

The next day I left the group to go to Marrakech. I was doing the trek alone to meet Shelby, who was flying in that evening. I’ve become very good at traveling alone, and though it is typically more stressful, I live for it. Made it to Marrakech with ease (and a couple hours early), so I walked from the train station to city center. I think if I would have informed my friends that I was doing this alone at dusk, they would’ve been pretty pissed—there is a lot of stigma behind the idea of women traveling alone in Africa, and just in general, for a bunch of different reasons. And a lot of it is valid—we live in a gross world and women do have to look out for their safety in ways that men have no concept of. But I also feel very confident in my ability to take care of myself (like, I carry a knife and know how to kick someone’s ass). So I walked across Marrakech in the twilight alone. And got a lot of cat calls, and a few guys stop or slow down their cars to try and get my attention. Comes with the territory of exploring developing countries (and developed countries. Let’s be real, people can be disgusting). I had the time of my life! Seeing Marrakech in my favorite way—leisurely and alone. Got to city center right as it was getting dark. Walked around the world-famous market (and got called a fashion disaster by an exasperated vendor who really wanted the attention I wasn’t paying him) for a while before Shelby hopped off her shuttle and we booked it to the hostel we reserved.

We stayed at Dream Kasbah—I would say it was a dream for sure. The hostel itself is cute, and the people that choose to stay there all seemed very fun to talk to and down for adventure. There was free breakfast, and they offered tours of different parts of Morocco. We walked to and through the market for a few hours (the shopping is fun, get your game face on for hardcore bargaining, and expect to be hassled if you look like a “foreigner”) (oh, and try the orange juice. Life changing.). We then hopped on a train back to Rabat.

It is then that my memory of the trip becomes a bit more of a blur—we only really had one day left, and right as Sam and her friends were leaving to head to the airport, I lost/had my wallet stolen. Aka all of my money, my debit cards, the works. Like, I was 24 hours away from moving to Asia for the rest of the year, and I had literally not a penny to my name. I am absolutely certain that if Shelby hadn’t been with me on that last day, I would have popped a blood vessel. Needless to say, the next couple weeks of my life were very complicated—full of loans and favors and money-transfers and packages being frantically sent across the world. I want to take an extra second to virtually hug any- and everyone that helped me out. Going broke as a nomad is actually terrifying, but there’s always a way to fix things!

Balance has been restored, no worries. And I am living in Taiwan for the rest of 2016! I’ll be posting a few odd blogs about the different things to do in Taiwan that I have found this year at some point. Until then, I miss everyone and hope you all are doing great!! Much love.

Mission Accom-Polish-ed (and Some Other Eastern European Countries)

In the middle of March, I went on a week-long holiday to Eastern Europe with my friend Shelby. Our goals were simple: to eat and drink our way through all of the places we visited, and take great photos of every step of the way. And to do it all for under a collective $250. (Spoiler: all goals were accomplished. Or accom-Polish-ed, if I may…) I’m going to break this blog down by each place we went throughout the week!

Bratislava, Slovakia: We had a very short window in Bratislava, but planned to use the 18 hours to their fullest potential. We flew in, hopped on the first bus into the city, and made it to our hostel pretty easy (A Wild Elephants Hostel is where we stayed, and I would recommend it to anyone and everyone!!!). The staff at the hostel took us on an “abandoned hospital sunset tour” and WOW. Just, wow. It was just Shelby and I on the tour, and a handful of volunteers from the hostel. We found our way to the top floor of a hospital that kinda could’ve definitely felt haunted if we were alone in there at night. But we sat on the roof (a free, incredible, view of the city of Bratislava), drank beer, and watched the sun set. Magic. We went out to dinner and hung out with some of the other guests of the hostel (and actually, literally, crushed the patriarchy that evening, but that’s another day’s story).

Prague, Czech Republic: What an incredible place. In a full day’s time, we were able to walk around and see all the major stuff the city has to offer. The astronomical clock and Old Town square, the John Lennon Wall, the Charles Bridge (we touched the good luck charm!), all of the incredible architecture, a lot of cool installation art scattered throughout the city, great (and cheap) food and drink. Prague is beautiful. (Side note, if you follow me on Snapchat, this is the city in which I posted a 5 minute long, very messy, story of Shelb and I trying Czech snacks and impersonating YouTube videos. Sorry, but also, not very sorry because we had a great night!)

Auschwitz/Birkenau: What an indescribable experience. I’ve struggled a lot on how to write about the visit to the museum/grounds, because it was so… Something. It was something. It was terrible. How could it not be? It gave me the same feeling as standing on top of the sunken ship in Pearl Harbor did. Or looking out of the Door of No Return on Goree Island in Senegal. It sucks. It’s uncomfortable. But I’m honored I had the opportunity to do it. To freely walk through the halls of a place that destroyed and ended so many lives—as an observant. Feeling nothing even close to what the million people that died there felt. Experiencing things like that—having such privilege to experience things like that—is horrifying and important. The tour guide I had said something right at the end of our tour that really stuck with me:  “Take what you see here, see it as a grain of salt on a bigger beach. This is a genocide we pay homage to, but it is not the only genocide that has ever happened. There is more than one genocide happening as I speak to you today. So be more than a visitor at a museum. Be more than a charitable donation. I hope today makes you want to do something, because I shouldn’t have to have a job at a former death camp. No one should have this job.”

Krakow, Poland: Probably my favorite place we stayed on this trip? We, again, saw a lot of the major sights in the full day we had there. The castle, the cathedral (and the dragon bones hanging over the door of the cathedral!), the old town square, the Jewish Quarter. We even rode in a horse drawn carriage (listen, it was cheap and we were feeling regal) through town square. The food was dangerously cheap, the people were interesting, and the hostel (Atlantis Hostel) was very nice. We had one roommate that we particularly enjoyed, an old man that had been everywhere in the world and was waiting for his papers to clear so he could return to his home in Ukraine. He bought us pizza while we were out one night, and gave it to us for breakfast the next morning. I love old people. I love Krakow.

Warsaw, Poland: Actually hardly saw the city at all. We had about an hour and a half to sight see, so we walked through old town (sensing a pattern here). We had heard mixed reviews about Warsaw, and ultimately ended up choosing to not spend a full day there. But after walking through old town, we have mild regret. Oh well, next time!

What a week it was. My disposable camera was filled with very stupid, lovely memories and my wallet was drained. Loved it. Be back soon.

P.S. I Love You, Ireland Pt. 2

After leaving California in late January (and stopping over to see some friends in New York City for a couple days), I landed in Ireland with a hangover and high hopes. I was to be volunteering at a hostel in County Wicklow—just south of Dublin—for the next month.

Through the site WorkAway, I was able to secure a bed at a hostel along the Wicklow Way—work a couple hours of housekeeping 5 days a week in exchange for free accommodations and spend the other two days a week however/wherever I please. (I almost always chose Dublin). As per usual, I showed up winging it. Found out it was about an hour’s walk from any bus stop/convenience store/civilization of any sorts. I half-expected that, and really came to love the seclusion, but when I had to trek back in the morning after a long night in Dublin, it could be a bit much. Still, loved every day of it.

The area is truly a dream. Though it rained most days (and snowed a couple times!), I did get a few full hiking days; the days I got lost for a few hours without a phone or a worry in the world are the ones that will stick with me. If the weather was shit for most of the day, but cleared up even briefly, I would slip out the back and walk down to a small, secret gazebo none of the other volunteers knew about. From the looks of it, the people whose property it was on used it as a place to practice shooting—there were empty bottles and cans lining the edge of it and shell casings all over the ground. It was an oasis for me. I would go there to write or read or take photos or nap if it wasn’t freezing.

My days off in Dublin are what made this stint in Ireland so lovely. I met up with friends and explored new parts of the area I didn’t have time to see before (like Dun Laoghaire and Howth and Killiney Hill and, a bit further out, Bray). I drank a lot. Ate a lot of buffalo wings and eggs benedict. I spent Valentine’s Day bowling with Shelby and Irish Mother’s Day eating homemade apple tart with Ciaran’s family. I worked my first photography gig making everyone look glam at an event for Ciaran’s veterinary class. I even celebrated St Patrick’s Day in Dublin! I wish I had more to say about that day but I started celebrating when I woke up and didn’t stop until I fell asleep on a street corner at midnight. It was grand.

My last weekend was spent on a road trip to county Mayo in the west of Ireland. What is supposed to be the rainiest part of Ireland was sunny and not freezing. We visited Clew Bay (which is composed of 365 islands woah), Ciaran and I briefly explored the town of Westport and went to a party at one of his friend’s houses. It’s funny to see Irish people’s reaction to a three-hour road trip, because for me that’s a day-trip to Santa Cruz or the Bay. Within a day of driving back to Dublin, I was off on my next adventure.

If this blog seems brief considering how long I was in Ireland, apologies. I was way more focused on myself and having a good time with my friends than documenting my every move. And I really did enjoy myself. I fuckin’ love Ireland. In a lot of ways, most of which are impossible to articulate. On to my next adventure. Hope everyone’s great. Talk soon.